Wishkah River

wishkah river

Location:
Flows into the east end of Grays Harbor at Aberdeen.

Directions:
Take U.S.12 to Aberdeen and turn right on Wishkah Road which parallels the river.

Facilities:
Aberdeen has all you amenitites.

Contact:
Big Mouth John’s Tackle

Species:
Winter Steelhead, Coho and Chinook Salmon, Resident and Sea-Run Cutthroat Trout, and Seaperch

Fishing the Wishkah:
Though only one valley away from the Hoquiam, the Wishkah is a much better salmon and steelhead river, thanks to its better fish habitat and access to the water. Though your chances of hooking a keeper chinook aren’t all that great, work your way up Wishkah Road to the mouth of the West Fork Wishkah during October and November and you just might locate a Coho or two.
The winter steelheading is up and down from year to year, but some season the Wishkah will give up 150-200 fish. The best part of fishing the river is that the steelhead fishing remains pretty consistent from December until the end of the season in March.
Sea-Run Cutthroat is fair in the river in the month of October. Like the nearby Hoquiam, the regulations call for the release of all wild non-clipped Cutthroats.

Grays River

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Location:
Enters the Lower Columbia River west of Skamokawa.

Directions:
Take Highway 4 west from Cathlamet or east from Naselle. To reach much of the middle portion of the river, take Loop Road south off the highway (midway between the town of Grays River, and the highway bridge over the river), or turn south on Highway 403 near Rosburg to reach the lower river.

Facilities:
Illwaco, the nearest town of any size, is about 20 miles to the southeast and offers all your amenities. About 30 miles to the west is Fort Canby State Park, which has tent and RV sites, restrooms with showers, and a small store.

Contact:

Species:
Winter Steelhead, Sea-Run Cutthroat, Resident Cutthroat, Chinook, and Coho Salmon.

Fishing the Grays River:
Once a pretty well respected winter steelhead stream, the Gray’s has slipped a few notches over the years. Although stocked with 40,000 to 50,000 steelhead smolts a year, the steelhead catch bumps up and down every year from 150-400 fish a winter. That’s probably a ray of hope for the visiting angler. When the few steelhead that return from their ocean adventures usually occurs in the months of December and January. Fall salmon fishing is a whole lot worse and is only open in certain areas. There can be some excellent cutthroat fishing in the months of October and November. I would stick with fishing a nightcrawler behind a slip sinker with a minimum of a 48″ leader.

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More than 1.2 million coho expected in Washington waters this summer!

This years prediction of coho abundance in 2014 that is almost three times larger than last year.

The forecast calls for 1,213,700 coho to arrive off the Washington coast, compared to a preseason forecast of 716,400 last year, when 445,300 actually returned.

These coho are the bread and butter for coastal and Columbia River fisheries, and just waxes figures since 2009.

The forecast in 2009 called for 1.2 million coho, with an actual return of about 1.05 million in what was deemed as a “wonderful ocean coho fishery season.”

Last year, the ocean sport fishery off the Washington coast had a sport catch hatchery coho quota of 78,760, and has hovered about 80,000 for the past four years.

This should give fisheries managers plenty of wiggle room to create some fairly decent fishing seasons off the coast at the ports of Neah Bay, La Push, Westport and Ilwaco, as well as those headed up the Columbia River.

Westport Marina’s Salmon Derby

Westport, Washington Boat Basin and Marina

Westport’s “Boat Basin Salmon Derby” offers chance to win up to $2,000
Annual fishing contest offers cash and prizes for the largest Chinook and Coho salmon caught inside the marina,s walls.

Westport, Washington – The coastal town of Westport welcomes returning salmon for the annual Boat Basin Salmon Derby scheduled to run from Sept. 15 until Oct. 31.

No derby ticket needed !

This year’s derby starts this Sunday, Sept. 15, and will end on Oct. 31. Participants are not required to purchase tickets to participate in the derby. Fishers will, instead, enter their catches for free and vie for merchandise and services prizes provided by local merchants.

Fish are weighed ‘in the round. Just get down there, start casting, land your salmon and take it directly to this year’s Westport Marina Salmon Derby weigh-in station at the floating Seafood Connection Market on Float 8, Slip G nearby.

Salmon Tales Derby

There will be an additional derby held on September 28 and 29 during the Salmon Tales Festival. If you catch a fish inside the boat basin during that time, take it to the Maritime Museum Gazebo to weigh in for the special derby competition.

Generational Derby

Another special weekend Derby also is planned for Oct 5 & 6. Age-appropriate prizes will be awarded to winning two- or three-person teams consisting of at least one adult and one child. Again, it’s free and there’s no need to sign up until you bring your fish in for weighing.

Derby rules:

• All salmon must be caught in the Westport Boat Basin. Fishing is open seven days a week, with a state-mandated allowable catch of 6 salmon (no more than 4 adults) that are 12 inches or more in length. Note that Grays Harbor is closed for Chinook other than in the Westport Marina.

• Contestants must land their own fish using sport fishing tackle.

• Help with netting or gaffing is permitted.

• Fish that are snagged, netted or caught by other illegal methods will be disqualified.

• The Seafood Connection judges will have the final decision in all cases. Prizes will be awarded for the largest salmon, judged by weight. In the case of a tie, the winner will be judged by length. Only one prize per fisher will be awarded.

Weigh-in rules

• Seafood Connection is the official weigh-in station. It is located on Float 8, Slip G.

• All salmon will be weighed in between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m., seven days a week.

• Following weigh-in, participants may not field-dress their fish on any float, the marina bankline or discard any fish parts into marina waters.

Violation of any rule is subject to suspension from the competition.

Derby winners

Winners will be determined at the close of the Derby at 5 p.m. on Oct. 31, and they will be notified by phone, email or mail by Nov. 10.

Prizes will be awarded for the top three fish of the season in the Adult Division, as well as for the top fish in the Junior Division – ages 15 and under.

The returning Westport salmon were fingerlings reared in pens three years ago and released under the direction of Ocosta High School conservation classes and the Humptulips Hatchery. After their time at sea, the salmon come back into the Marina – with the Coho salmon returning now.
You don’t need a boat, you can just a fish from the dock.

Last year’s winning Coho weighed in at more than 17.5 lbs !

I was down at the marina last year and you could see salmon schools with literally tens of thousands of fish just off the floats over by the Half Moon Bay Bar and Grill. This derby promises to be an excellent year for anglers as well. There is a limit of six fish, four adults and two jacks.”

Washington State Fish and Wildlife Fishing Reports July 30th – August 4th

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Everett ramp – July 30: 37 boats with 84 anglers caught 13 chinook, four coho and 18 pinks; July 31: 38 boats with 76 anglers caught 18 chinook, six coho and nine pinks; Aug. 2: 79 boats with 178 anglers caught 35 chinook, 16 coho and 26 pinks; Aug. 3: 231 boats with 564 anglers caught 30 chinook, 56 coho and 95 pinks; Aug. 4: 246 boats with 587 anglers caught 44 chinook, 56 coho and 101 pinks.

Shilshole Bay ramp – July 30: 42 boats with 87 anglers caught 19 chinook, 16 coho and 25 pinks; July 31: 73 boats with 133 anglers caught 22 chinook, 16 coho and 26 pinks; Aug. 1: 41 boats with 82 anglers caught 23 chinook, nine coho and 13 pinks; Aug. 2: 76 boats with 162 anglers caught 29 chinook, 31 coho and 24 pinks; Aug. 3: 140 boats with 309 anglers caught 28 chinook, 31 coho and 39 pinks; Aug. 4: 72 boats with 165 anglers caught 10 chinook, 33 coho and 55 pinks.

Kingston ramp – July 31: 24 boats with 49 anglers caught two chinook, 23 coho, four pinks and five herring.

Don Armeni ramp, West Seattle – Aug. 2: 13 boats with 23 anglers caught four chinook, one coho and three chum; Aug. 4: 77 boats with 177 anglers caught 22 chinook, seven coho and 29 pinks.

Port Orchard ramp – July 29: Six boats with nine anglers caught two chinook; July 31: Six boats with 12 anglers caught three chinook.

Manchester ramp – July 30: 11 boats with 18 anglers caught no fish.

Ediz Hook ramp, Port Angeles – July 30: 29 boats with 51 anglers caught 22 chinook, one coho and 40 pinks; July 31: 27 boats with 56 anglers caught 33 chinook and 33 pinks; Aug. 1: 14 boats with 23 anglers caught eight chinook, one coho and five pinks; Aug. 2: 39 boats with 73 anglers caught 31 chinook, one coho and 66 pinks; Aug. 3: 62 boats with 135 anglers caught 38 chinook, five coho and 139 pinks; Aug. 4: 54 boats with 116 anglers caught 17 chinook and 84 pinks.

Olson’s Resort, Sekiu – July 30: 41 boats with 100 anglers caught 46 chinook, nine ocho and 77 pinks; July 31: 23 boats with 52 anglers caught nine chinook, two coho and 77 pinks; Aug. 1: 70 boats with 166 anglers caught 51 chinook, 11 coho, 97 pinks, three rockfish and 13 kelp greenling; Aug. 2: 76 boats with 193 anglers caught 103 chinook, seven coho and 124 pinks; Aug. 3: 15 boats with 41 anglers caught 13 chinook, five coho, 11 pinks and seven rockfish; aug. 4: 152 boats with 419 anglers caught 74 chinook, 38 coho, 219 pinks and five rockfish.

Van Riper’s Resort, Sekiu – July 30:
39 boats with 97 anglers caught 38 chinook, 11 coho and 89 pinks; Aug. 1: 42 boats with 103 anglers caught 38 chinook, eight coho and 101 pinks; Aug. 2: 41 boats with 97 anglers caught 58 chinook, five coho and 88 pinks; Aug. 3: 13 boats with 25 anglers caught 12 chinook, seven coho and 27 pinks.

John Wayne Marina, Sequim – Aug. 4: Eight boats with 16 anglers caught four chinook.

Glenn Street ramp, Bellingham – July 29: Six boats with 17 anglers caught three chinook and three pinks; Aug. 2: Two boats with six anglers caught one chinook and three pinks; Aug. 3: 15 boats with 42 anglers caught five chinook and 11 pinks; Aug. 4: 21 boats with 46 anglers caught five chinook and 37 pinks.

Blaine ramp – July 29: One boat with two anglers caught no fish; Aug. 3: Two boats with seven anglers caught two chinook; Aug. 4: Three boats with eight anglers caught no fish.

Cornet Bay ramp, North Whidbey Island – July 29: Seven boats with 15 anglers caught two chinook, four coho and 10 pinks; Aug. 2: Seven boats with 21 anglers caught 12 chinook, one coho and 13 pinks; Aug. 4: 31 boats with 71 anglers caught seven chinook, two coho and 32 pinks.

Washington Park ramp, Anacortes – July 29: 17 boats with 44 anglers caught five chinook and 10 pinks; Aug. 2: Nine boats with 19 anglers caught one chinook and two pinks; Aug. 3: 17 boats with 40 anglers caught four chinook and three pinks; Aug. 4: 17 boats with 47 anglers caught nine chinook and 14 pinks.

Griffin Bay ramp, San Juan Island – Aug. 2: One boat with one angler caught no fish; Aug. 3: Four boats with 13 anglers caught 13 pinks; Aug. 4: Five boats with 11 anglers caught 24 pinks.

Swinomish Channel ramp – Aug. 2: Three boats with seven anglers caught one chinook.

Redondo Beach ramp – July 29: 31 boats with 89 anglers caught one chinook, five coho, 13 pinks and 10 flounder; July 30: 51 boats with 93 anglers caught six chinook, one coho, 33 pinks and 13 flounder; Aug. 3: 122 boats with 268 anglers caught seven chinook, one coho, 146 pinks and 98 flounder.

Dash Point Pier – Aug. 3: 103 anglers caught 44 pinks, 36 flounder and 12 herring.

Brownsville ramp – Aug. 3: 27 boats with 60 anglers caught seven chinook, 10 coho, 17 pinks and one flounder.

Solo Point ramp, South Tacoma – July 29: One boat with four anglers caught two flounder.

Narrows Park Properties Pier – July 29: 14 anglers caught five pinks.

Point Defiance Park Boathouse, Tacoma – July 29: 27 boats with 31 anglers caught seven chinook, one coho and five pinks; July 30: 24 boats with 31 anglers caught eight chinook and five pinks; Aug. 2: 30 boats with 36 anglers caught seven chinook, two coho and three pinks; Aug. 4: 33 boats with 62 anglers caught three chinook, two pinks and 19 flounder.

Point Defiance Park ramp, Tacoma – July 29: 30 boats with 58 anglers caught four chinook and 13 pinks; July 30: 52 boats with 111 anglers caught 10 chinook, 22 pinks and nine flounder; July 31: Seven boats with 16 anglers caught eight chinook, one coho and 12 pinks; Aug. 4: 178 boats with 398 anglers caught seven chinook, two coho, 76 pinks and 56 flounder.

Gig Harbor ramp – July 29: 18 boats with 28 anglers caught two pinks; July 31: 12 boats with 24 anglers caught one chinook and five pinks; Aug. 4: Five boats with nine anglers caught one chinook and two pinks.

Narrows ramp – July 29: Seven boats with 18 anglers caught one pink; Aug. 3: Four boats with eight anglers caught one pink; Aug. 4: Seven boats with 16 anglers caught one pink and one flounder.

Narrows Marina – Aug. 3: Eight boats with 12 anglers caught six chinook.

Zittel’s Marina – July 29: Five boats with 10 anglers caught no fish; Aug. 4: 16 boats with 35 anglers caught 35 flounder.

Boston Harbor Marina – July 30: One boat with two anglers caught no fish; Aug. 3: Two boats with three anglers caught no fish.

Steilacoom ramp – July 30: One boat with two anglers caught no fish; July 31: One boat with one angler caught no fish.

Luhr Beach ramp – July 30: Six boats with 12 anglers caught five flounder; Aug. 3: Eight boats with 16 anglers caught no fish.

Hartstene Island ramp – Aug. 3: One boat with two anglers caught one chinook.

Hoodsport shoreline, Hood Canal – July 29: 29 anglers caught three pinks; Aug. 4: 24 anglers caught five chinook and one pink.

Skokomish ramp, Hood Canal – July 29: Five boats with 10 anglers caught no fish; Aug. 2: Six boats with 12 anglers caught one chinook; Aug. 4: 13 boats with 31 anglers caught two pinks.

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Coastal Salmon Figures, Quota’s & Catches

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OCEAN RECREATIONAL SALMON FISHERY RESULTS

Coastwide Chinook mark-selective fishery

The Chinook mark-selective recreational fishery is now closed. The fishery operated under a coastwide quota of 8,000 marked Chinook. A total of 8,358 anglers participated in the fishery, and 2,798 Chinook were landed (35% of the quota).

All-Salmon Species Fisheries

The Columbia Ocean Area opened for all salmon species on June 22; the Westport Area opened for all salmon species on June 23. The La Push and Neah Bay Areas opened for all salmon species on June 29. Catch details for each of the areas are described below.

ILWACO

A total of 1,854 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 467 Chinook and 1,927 coho. No pink were landed. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 3,059 Chinook (31% of the area guideline) and 8,432 coho (23% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

WESTPORT

A total of 2,406 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 1,541 Chinook, 910 coho, and 308 pink. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 3,910 Chinook (17% of the area guideline) and 3,475 coho (13% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

LA PUSH

A total of 194 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 263 Chinook, 87 coho, and 49 pink. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 758 Chinook (46% of the area guideline) and 495 coho (26% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

NEAH BAY

A total of 1,572 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 565 Chinook, 556 coho, and 966 pink. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 3,605 Chinook (74% of the area guideline) and 3,316 coho (43% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

Puyallup River Recreational Fishing Update 7/25/2013

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puyallup river salmon fishing

Recreational salmon fishing on the Puyallup River from the City of Puyallup outfall structure across the river from the junction of Freeman Road and North Levee Road upstream to the mouth of the White River is open on the following dates:

Aug. 1 through 10, and Aug. 12 through Aug. 31
Sept. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, and 28

Recreational salmon fishing on the Puyallup River from the 11th Street Bridge upstream to the City of Puyallup outfall structure across the river from the junction of Freeman Road and North Levee Road, will be open on the following dates:

Aug. 16 through Aug. 31
Sept. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, and 28

In all areas, anglers will have a daily limit of six salmon (minimum size 12 inches). Anglers may keep up to four adult salmon, of which only two may be any combination of chinook, coho and chum. All wild adult chinook salmon must be released.

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2013 Coastal Ocean Salmon Fishing Sizzling!

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Frankie B. at Sekui today with one of four fin-clipped Chinook’s to limit the boat out!
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Fishing sizzles in July for salmon, steelhead, crab, trout, other gamefish.

Summer fishing seasons are now in full swing, requiring anglers to make some tough decisions about how to spend their time on the water. Salmon, steelhead, crab, trout, bass and walleye – all are now available for harvest in various waters around the state.

But for thousands of anglers, nothing beats the thrill of reeling in a big chinook salmon. Many are doing just that as waves of chinook move south along the Washington coast, then east into Puget Sound, coastal streams and the Columbia River.

“Fishing for both chinook salmon and hatchery coho should improve off the coast right through the month,” said Doug Milward, ocean salmon manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). “The same is true for Puget Sound and other inside waters.”

Six marine areas of Puget Sound open to salmon fishing July 1, joining other salmon fisheries already in progress. Various westside rivers, including the Bogacheil, Calawah and Nisqually, also open for salmon fishing that day, and Baker Lake in Whatcom County opens for sockeye salmon July 10.

Summer steelhead are another option – notably in Columbia River and many of its tributaries – where 339,200 adult fish are expected to move upriver in the coming weeks. As always, anglers are required to release any wild, unmarked steelhead they intercept in the fishery, which extends from the mouth of the Columbia to the Canadian Border.

Rather catch some crab? All but one marine area in Puget Sound will open for crab fishing July 1. The exception is Marine Area 7, where the crab fishery opens July 15 in the area’s southern portion (San Juan Islands/Bellingham) and Aug. 15 in the northern portion (Gulf of Georgia).

Crab fishing has been hot so far! Opening day we had 18 keepers in one pot out of Potlach state park on Hoods Canal. Also, on 7/4 two boats with five on one and 3 on the other amounted to 8 limits in 1 hour in the South Sound.

The crab fishery in all marine areas of Puget Sound will be open Thursday through Monday of each week. The season will get under way with a one-day opening (July 1), and will be closed July 2-3 before reopening on its regular weekly schedule Thursday, July 4.

Here are the numbers for the 2013 coastal salmon fishery as of July 4, 2013 updated.

ILWACO

June 22-23: 968 anglers caught 715 Chinook for 0.74 fish per rod, and 809 hatchery coho for 0.84 fish per rod and 1.57 total per rod average; and June 24-30: 2,364 anglers caught 683 Chinook (14.1 percent of Chinook quota of 9,900) for 0.29 fish per rod, and 2,607 hatchery coho (9.1 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 37,380) for 1.10 fish per rod and 1.39 total per rod average.

WESTPORT

June 23: 694 anglers caught 215 Chinook for 0.31 fish per rod, and 173 hatchery coho for 0.25 fish per rod and 0.56 total per rod average; and June 24-30: 899 anglers caught 274 Chinook (2.1 percent of Chinook quota of 23,500) for 0.30 fish per rod, and 202 hatchery coho (1.4 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 27,660) for 0.22 fish per rod and 0.53 total per rod average.

LA PUSH

June 29-30: 123 anglers caught 64 Chinook (3.9 percent of Chinook quota of 1,650) for 0.52 fish per rod, and 55 hatchery coho (2.9 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 1,890) for 0.45 fish per rod and 0.99 total per rod average.

NEAH BAY

June 29-30: 887 anglers caught 342 Chinook (7.0 percent of Chinook quota of 4,900) for 0.39 fish per rod, and 218 hatchery coho (2.8 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 7,780) for 0.25 fish per rod and 0.66 total per rod average.

COASTWIDE HATCHERY CHINOOK FISHERY

May 10-11: 629 anglers caught 72 hatchery chinook for 0.11 fish per rod average (0.9 percent of the total catch quota); May 17-18: 347 anglers caught 136 hatchery chinook for 0.18 fish per rod average (1.7 percent of the total catch quota); June 8-9: 762 anglers caught 208 chinook; June 10-16: 3,511 anglers caught 1,272 for 0.36 fish per rod average (20.2 percent of the total catch quota); June 17-23: 2,648 anglers caught 1,082 Chinook for 0.41 fish per rod average (33.7 percent of the total catch quota); June 24-28: 460 anglers caught 101 Chinook for 0.22 fish per rod average (35.0 percent of the total catch quota).

COASTWIDE ALL-SPECIES SALMON FISHERY

June 22-23: 1,662 anglers caught 929 Chinook (2.3 percent of Chinook quota of 40,000) for 0.56 fish per rod, and 982 hatchery coho (1.3 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 74,760) for 0.59 fish per rod and 1.15 total per rod average;

June 24-30: 4,273 anglers caught 1,363 Chinook (5.7 percent of Chinook quota of 40,000) for 0.32 fish per rod, and 3,082 hatchery coho (5.4 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 74,760) for 0.72 fish per rod and 1.05 total per rod average.