Big runs of Columbia River Chinook, Coho highlight 2014 Salmon forecasts

wdfg

live_cropped

OLYMPIA – Salmon fishing in the ocean and the Columbia River this summer could be great thanks to an abundant run of hatchery coho and a potentially historic return of chinook, according to state fishery managers.

Opportunities for anglers also look good in Puget Sound, where another strong run of coho salmon is expected this year.

The forecasts – developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and treaty Indian tribes – for chinook, coho, sockeye and chum salmon were released at a public meeting in Olympia today, marking the starting point for developing 2014 salmon-fishing seasons.

Ron Warren, fisheries policy lead for WDFW, said protecting and restoring weak wild salmon populations will continue to be the top priority as fishery managers develop salmon seasons.

“It’s early in the process, but these forecasts point to an exciting summer of salmon fishing,” Warren said. “We look forward to working with our tribal co-managers and constituents to establish fishing opportunities on abundant runs of hatchery salmon while ensuring we meet our conservation goals for wild fish populations.”

This year’s forecasts include a return of more than 1.6 million Columbia River fall chinook salmon – which would be the largest since record-keeping began in 1938. A return of nearly 1 million Columbia River coho salmon is expected back this summer as well.

“This certainly could be a banner year for summer salmon fisheries, particularly off the Washington coast and in the Columbia River,” Warren said.

As in past years, salmon-fishing prospects in 2014 vary by area:

Columbia River: Of the 1.6 million fall chinook expected to return to the Columbia River this season, nearly 86 percent of those fish are “bright” stocks. Those fish, most of which are destined for areas above Bonneville Dam, are the foundation of the in-river recreational salmon fishery.
If that run comes in as forecast, the total number of brights would exceed last year’s entire Columbia River run of 1.2 million chinook salmon. Additionally, the ocean abundance of Columbia River coho is forecast to be about 964,000 fish, three times as many fish as last year’s actual abundance.

Washington’s ocean waters: The strong return of Columbia River salmon should also boost fisheries in the ocean this year.
About 225,000 lower river hatchery chinook are expected back this season, 35,000 more fish than last year’s return. Those salmon, known as “tules,” are the backbone of the recreational ocean chinook fishery.

The abundant coho salmon return projected for the Columbia River will contribute to fisheries off the coast of Washington as well, said Doug Milward, ocean salmon fishery manager for WDFW.

“This is the first time in more than a decade we have had exceptionally strong forecasts for chinook and coho in the same year,” Milward said. “That’s good news for anglers because those abundant runs could result in higher catch quotas for both species this summer in the ocean.”

Puget Sound: Summer/fall chinook salmon returns to Puget Sound are expected to total nearly 283,000 fish, slightly higher than last year’s forecast. Most chinook fisheries in Puget Sound, where hatchery chinook make up the bulk of the returning fish, will be similar to last year, said Ryan Lothrop, recreational fishery manager for WDFW.
A strong run of coho salmon is expected back to Puget Sound as well. Nearly 873,000 coho are forecast to return to the Sound’s streams, similar to last year’s projection. Lothrop said bright spots for coho include the Nisqually, Skokomish, Skagit, Stillaguamish and Snohomish rivers, as well as Lake Washington and the marine waters of mid- and south Puget Sound.

A nother bright spot is Baker Lake, where an abundant sockeye return of 35,000 salmon is expected back this year. Fishery managers will once again consider sockeye fisheries in Baker Lake and the Skagit River, Lothrop said.

A nother possibility is bonus bag limits for sockeye during summer salmon fisheries in marine areas around the San Juan Islands and in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. “About 23 million sockeye salmon are forecast to return to Canada’s Fraser River this year, and a portion of those fish will make their way through those marine areas,” Lothrop said.

However, a sockeye fishery in Lake Washington is unlikely this year, Lothrop said. The sockeye forecast is about 167,000, well below the minimum return of 350,000 sockeye needed to consider opening a recreational fishery in the lake.

State, tribal and federal fishery managers will meet March 8-13 in Sacramento with the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) to develop options for this year’s commercial and recreational ocean chinook and coho salmon fisheries. The PFMC establishes fishing seasons in ocean waters three to 200 miles off the Pacific coast.

Additional public meetings have been scheduled through March to discuss regional fishery issues. Input from these regional discussions will be considered as the season-setting process moves into the “North of Falcon” and PFMC meetings, which will determine the final 2014 salmon seasons.

The PFMC is expected to adopt final ocean fishing seasons and harvest levels at its April 5-10 meeting in Vancouver, Wash. The 2014 salmon fisheries package for Washington’s inside waters will be completed by the state and tribal co-managers during the PFMC’s April meeting.

A meeting schedule, salmon forecasts and information about the salmon season-setting process are available on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/

MC Rocket

Advertisements

Coastal Salmon Figures, Quota’s & Catches

westport

live_cropped

OCEAN RECREATIONAL SALMON FISHERY RESULTS

Coastwide Chinook mark-selective fishery

The Chinook mark-selective recreational fishery is now closed. The fishery operated under a coastwide quota of 8,000 marked Chinook. A total of 8,358 anglers participated in the fishery, and 2,798 Chinook were landed (35% of the quota).

All-Salmon Species Fisheries

The Columbia Ocean Area opened for all salmon species on June 22; the Westport Area opened for all salmon species on June 23. The La Push and Neah Bay Areas opened for all salmon species on June 29. Catch details for each of the areas are described below.

ILWACO

A total of 1,854 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 467 Chinook and 1,927 coho. No pink were landed. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 3,059 Chinook (31% of the area guideline) and 8,432 coho (23% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

WESTPORT

A total of 2,406 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 1,541 Chinook, 910 coho, and 308 pink. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 3,910 Chinook (17% of the area guideline) and 3,475 coho (13% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

LA PUSH

A total of 194 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 263 Chinook, 87 coho, and 49 pink. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 758 Chinook (46% of the area guideline) and 495 coho (26% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

NEAH BAY

A total of 1,572 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 565 Chinook, 556 coho, and 966 pink. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 3,605 Chinook (74% of the area guideline) and 3,316 coho (43% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

Washington State Fish and Wildlife Fishing Reports July 15th – 21st

wdfw

Don Armeni ramp, West Seattle — July 19: 19 boats with 39 anglers caught three chinook and seven coho; July 20: 57 boats with 120 anglers caught nine chinook, 11 coho and 103 flounder; July 21: 50 boats with 120 anglers caught four chinook, 15 coho and two pinks.

Eddie Vine ramp, Shilshole Bay — July 16: 75 boats with 153 anglers caught 66 chinook, 22 coho, one pink and 25 flounder; July 17: 19 boats with 39 anglers caught 11 chinook; July 19: 93 boats with 180 anglers caught 24 chinook, 20 coho and 29 flounder; July 20: 115 boats with 244 anglers caught 30 chinook, 28 coho, four pinks and 80 flounder; July 21: 107 boats with 215 anglers caught 24 chinook, 29 coho, five pinks, one sockeye and 68 flounder.

Everett ramp — July 16: 94 boats with 212 anglers caught 96 chinook, 11 coho, three pinks and nine flounder; July 17: 25 boats with 61 angles caught 19 chinook and one coho; July 19: 98 boats with 217 anglers caught 54 chinook, 10 coho and 53 flounder; July 20: 211 boats with 498 anglers caught 60 chinook, 25 coho, three pinks and 126 flounder; July 21: 175 boats with 390 anglers caught 39 chinook, 10 coho, 10 pinks and 155 flounder.

Manchester ramp — July 17: Nine boats with 19 anglers caught one chinook and two coho; July 19: 20 boats with 36 anglers caught two coho and 16 herring.

Kingston ramp — July 16: 33 boats with 75 anglers caught 12 chinook, three coho and 17 flounder; July 21: 59 boats with 134 anglers caught eight chinook, 15 coho, one pink and four flounder.

Port Orchard ramp — July 15: Five boats with 10 anglers caught no fish; July 16: Three boats with three anglers caught no fish; July 18: Four boats with eight anglers caught one coho; July 21: Two boats with three anglers caught no fish.

Glenn Street ramp, Bellingham — July 20: 25 boats with 60 anglers caught nine chinook, one coho and 37 pinks.

Blaine ramp — July 19: Three boats with six anglers caught no fish; July 20: Two boats with seven anglers caught one kelp greenling and three lingcod; July 21: Three boats with six anglers caught eight pinks and two lingcod.

Swinomish Channel ramp — July 20: Eight boats with 21 anglers caught two chinook and five pinks; July 21: Six boats with 14 anglers caught two chinook and one pink.

Cornet Bay ramp, North Whidbey Island — July 15: Six boats with 14 anglers caught 12 pinks; July 19: Three boats with five anglers caught two pinks; July 20: 11 boats with 28 anglers caught one chinook and 18 pinks; July 21: Four boats with nine anglers caught no fish.

Washington Park ramp, Anacortes — July 15: 24 boats with 43 anglers caught 13 chinook and four pinks; July 19: Eight boats with 22 anglers caught six pinks; July 20: 20 boats with 59 anglers caught 11 chinook, one coho and 38 pinks; July 21: 13 boats with 38 anglers caught 21 pinks.

Olson’s Resort, Sekiu — July 16: 45 boats with 110 anglers caught 37 chinook, 53 coho, 19 pinks and three rockfish; July 17: 22 boats with 50 anglers caught 19 chinook, 14 coho, four pinks, 11 rockfish and one kelp greenling; July 18: 37 boats with 85 anglers caught 70 chinook, 18 coho, seven pinks and one rockfish; July 19: Five boats with 14 anglers caught 13 chinook, three coho, two pinks and two rockfish; July 20: 86 boats with 206 anglers caught 130 chinook, 10 coho and 61 pinks; July 21: 62 boats with 168 anglers caught 44 chinook, 10 coho, 13 pinks and one rockfish.

Van Riper’s Resort, Sekiu — July 16: 20 boats with 39 anglers caught 10 chinook, nine coho, four pinks, one rockfish, two lingcod and two kelp greenling; July 18: 37 boats with 85 anglers caught 70 chinook, 18 coho, seven pinks and one rockfish; July 19: 50 boats with 123 anglers caught 46 chinook, 13 coho, 33 pinks and one rockfish; July 20: 51 boats with 141 anglers caught 70 chinook, five coho, 16 pinks and three rockfish.

Curley’s Straitside Resort, Sekiu — July 18: 13 boats with 39 anglers caught 11 chinook, seven coho and three pinks; July 20: 13 boats with 33 anglers caught five chinook, four coho and 15 pinks.

Freshwater Bay ramp — July 19: 18 boats with 31 anglers caught 27 chinook, four coho and 10 pinks; July 21: 22 boats with 41 anglers caught 28 chinook, six coho and 15 pinks.

Ediz Hook ramp, Port Angeles — July 17: 36 boats with 71 anglers 34 chinook and nine pinks; July 18: 41 boats with 81 anglers caught 37 chinook, one coho and 13 pinks; July 19: Four boats with 10 anglers caught no fish; July 20: 44 boats with 91 anglers caught 26 chinook, two coho and two pinks; July 21: 59 boats with 139 anglers caught 51 chinook, one coho and 10 pinks.

Fort Worden State Park ramp north of Port Townsend — July 21: 31 boats with 68 anglers caught 42 chinook.

Port Townsend Boat Haven Marina — July 16: 79 boats with 169 anglers caught 194 chinook and one pink; July 17: 67 boats with 149 anglers caught 70 chinook and one coho; July 19: 63 boats with 130 anglers caught 55 chinook, three coho and one pink; July 20: 67 boats with 154 anglers caught 37 chinook, two coho and three pinks; July 21: 43 boats with 98 anglers caught 24 chinook and one pink.

Hoodsport shoreline, Hood Canal — July 15: 10 anglers caught one pink; July 20: 20 anglers caught four pinks; July 21: Nine anglers caught one chinook and five pinks.

Salsbury County Park ramp, Hood Canal — July 18: Two boats with three anglers caught one chinook.

Skokomish ramp, Hood Canal — July 20: Eight boats with 22 anglers caught two chinook; July 21: Nine boats with 17 anglers caught four chinook.

Redondo Beach ramp — July 16: 13 boats with 23 anglers caught three chinook, one pink and 16 flounder; July 19: 44 boats with 94 anglers caught one chinook, two coho and 165 flounder.

Narrows Marina and ramp — July 15: Five boats with 10 anglers caught no fish; July 18: Five boats with eight anglers caught one chinook; July 21: 11 boats with 25 anglers caught one chinook and six flounder.

Gig Harbor ramp — July 21:
Five boats with seven anglers caught no fish.

Dash Point Park Pier — July 16: Two anglers caught one pink.

Point Defiance Park ramp and Boathouse, Tacoma — July 15: 48 boats with 73 anglers caught seven chinook, one coho and 41 flounder; July 16: 36 boats with 72 anglers caught one chinook and 22 flounder; July 17: 22 boats with 36 anglers caught three chinook and 24 flounder; July 19: 53 boats with 114 anglers caught nine chinook, two pinks and 17 flounder; July 21: 103 boats with 223 anglers caught 12 chinook, one coho, one pink and 162 flounder.

Solo Point ramp south of Tacoma — July 19: Three boats with six anglers caught no fish.

Luhr Beach ramp — July 16: One boat with two anglers caught no fish; July 21: Five boats with eight anglers caught no fish.

Zittel’s Marina — July 15: Five boats with 12 anglers caught no fish; July 19: Four boats with nine anglers caught no fish.

Wollochett Bay ramp — July 20: Two boats with three anglers caught one coho.

Boston Harbor Marina — July 21: Five boats with 11 anglers caught no fish.

Columbia River below Bonneville Dam — July 15-21: 1,445 bank anglers caught four sockeye and 150 steelhead, and released seven chinook, and 285 sockeye; 237 boats with 536 anglers caught 113 steelhead, and released one chinook and 178 steelhead; five boats with 10 anglers released 13 sturgeon; one bank angler caught no shad; 12 boats with 20 anglers caught eight walleye.

Columbia River in The Dalles Pool — July 15-21: Three bank anglers released 20 sturgeon; five boats with nine anglers released 53 sturgeon; 14 bank anglers released one wild steelhead; two boats with four anglers caught two walleye and released four; two boats with four anglers released 50 bass.

Cowlitz River— July 15-21: 20 bank anglers caught 19 mini jack chinook and one cutthroat trout; 74 boat anglers caught 43 steelhead and released one cutthroat trout.

Lewis River mainstem — July 15-21: Nine boat anglers released one steelhead.

Lewis River North Fork — July 15-21: 11 bank anglers caught no fish.

Drano Lake — July 15-21: Two bank anglers caught no fish; 15 boat anglers caught one steelhead and released eight.

live_cropped