Recreational salmon fishery opens June 24 in the ocean

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WDFW NEWS RELEASE
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
600 Capitol Way North, Olympia, WA 98501-1091

http://wdfw.wa.gov/

June 22, 2017
Contact:
Wendy Beeghley, (360) 249-4628, ext. 215

Recreational salmon fishery opens June 24 in the ocean

OLYMPIA – Sport anglers will have the opportunity to reel in salmon off the Washington coast starting Saturday, June 24.

That’s when marine areas 1 (Ilwaco), 3 (La Push) and 4 (Neah Bay) open daily for salmon fishing. Marine Area 2 (Westport) will open a week later on July 1.

Fish managers expect slightly higher numbers of chinook and coho salmon will make their way through the ocean this year as compared to 2016, said Wendy Beeghley, an ocean salmon manager with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

Due to the improved forecasts, the recreational chinook catch quota this year is 45,000, up from 35,000 in 2016.This year’s coho quota of 42,000 fish is an increase of 23,100 coho from 2016, when anglers were allowed to keep coho only in Marine Area 1. Coho retention is allowed in all four marine areas this summer.

Anglers fishing in marine areas 1 and 2 will have a daily limit of two salmon, only one of which can be a chinook. In areas 3 and 4, anglers will have a two-salmon daily limit. In all areas, anglers must release wild coho.

All four marine areas are scheduled to close to salmon fishing at the end of the day Sept. 4 but could close earlier if the quota is met.

Throughout the summer, anglers can check WDFW’s webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/creel/ocean/ for updates.

More information about the fisheries can be found in the 2017-18 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, available at license vendors and sporting goods stores and online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/publications/01914/2017-18_marine.pdf

 

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Anglers can keep hatchery and wild coho in ocean at Westport, Neah Bay, Lapush, and Illwaco

OLYMPIA – Anglers will be allowed to retain both wild and hatchery coho beginning Friday, Sept. 4, in all four ocean marine areas.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) previously limited anglers fishing in marine areas 1-4 to hatchery coho – marked with a missing adipose fin – to meet conservation goals for wild coho while extending fishing through the entire salmon season, said Doug Milward, ocean salmon manager for the department.

However, with a month remaining in the fishery, only 43 percent of the coho quota has been reached for the coast.

“With so much of the coho catch quota remaining this late in the season, we can allow anglers to keep both hatchery and wild coho without exceeding our conservation objectives for wild salmon,” Milward said.

Through Aug. 30, anglers have caught 64,576 coho of the 150,800 coho quota for the coast.

Ocean salmon fisheries are currently scheduled to continue through Sept. 30 in all four marine areas.

Anglers have a two-salmon daily catch limit in all four marine areas off the Washington coast. Up to two chinook may be retained in Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco) and Marine Area 2 (Westport); anglers fishing off La Push (Marine Area 3) and west of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line off Neah Bay (Marine Area 4) can keep one chinook as well as two additional pink salmon as part of their daily catch limit.

For additional details on fishing regulations, check the fishing regulations pamphlet at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/

Fishery managers will continue to monitor the ocean salmon fishery throughout the season, and announce any other changes on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/

Coastal Salmon Figures, Quota’s & Catches

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OCEAN RECREATIONAL SALMON FISHERY RESULTS

Coastwide Chinook mark-selective fishery

The Chinook mark-selective recreational fishery is now closed. The fishery operated under a coastwide quota of 8,000 marked Chinook. A total of 8,358 anglers participated in the fishery, and 2,798 Chinook were landed (35% of the quota).

All-Salmon Species Fisheries

The Columbia Ocean Area opened for all salmon species on June 22; the Westport Area opened for all salmon species on June 23. The La Push and Neah Bay Areas opened for all salmon species on June 29. Catch details for each of the areas are described below.

ILWACO

A total of 1,854 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 467 Chinook and 1,927 coho. No pink were landed. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 3,059 Chinook (31% of the area guideline) and 8,432 coho (23% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

WESTPORT

A total of 2,406 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 1,541 Chinook, 910 coho, and 308 pink. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 3,910 Chinook (17% of the area guideline) and 3,475 coho (13% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

LA PUSH

A total of 194 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 263 Chinook, 87 coho, and 49 pink. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 758 Chinook (46% of the area guideline) and 495 coho (26% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

NEAH BAY

A total of 1,572 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week ending July 28, landing 565 Chinook, 556 coho, and 966 pink. Through Sunday, July 28, a cumulative total of 3,605 Chinook (74% of the area guideline) and 3,316 coho (43% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

2013 Coastal Ocean Salmon Fishing Sizzling!

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Frankie B. at Sekui today with one of four fin-clipped Chinook’s to limit the boat out!
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Fishing sizzles in July for salmon, steelhead, crab, trout, other gamefish.

Summer fishing seasons are now in full swing, requiring anglers to make some tough decisions about how to spend their time on the water. Salmon, steelhead, crab, trout, bass and walleye – all are now available for harvest in various waters around the state.

But for thousands of anglers, nothing beats the thrill of reeling in a big chinook salmon. Many are doing just that as waves of chinook move south along the Washington coast, then east into Puget Sound, coastal streams and the Columbia River.

“Fishing for both chinook salmon and hatchery coho should improve off the coast right through the month,” said Doug Milward, ocean salmon manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). “The same is true for Puget Sound and other inside waters.”

Six marine areas of Puget Sound open to salmon fishing July 1, joining other salmon fisheries already in progress. Various westside rivers, including the Bogacheil, Calawah and Nisqually, also open for salmon fishing that day, and Baker Lake in Whatcom County opens for sockeye salmon July 10.

Summer steelhead are another option – notably in Columbia River and many of its tributaries – where 339,200 adult fish are expected to move upriver in the coming weeks. As always, anglers are required to release any wild, unmarked steelhead they intercept in the fishery, which extends from the mouth of the Columbia to the Canadian Border.

Rather catch some crab? All but one marine area in Puget Sound will open for crab fishing July 1. The exception is Marine Area 7, where the crab fishery opens July 15 in the area’s southern portion (San Juan Islands/Bellingham) and Aug. 15 in the northern portion (Gulf of Georgia).

Crab fishing has been hot so far! Opening day we had 18 keepers in one pot out of Potlach state park on Hoods Canal. Also, on 7/4 two boats with five on one and 3 on the other amounted to 8 limits in 1 hour in the South Sound.

The crab fishery in all marine areas of Puget Sound will be open Thursday through Monday of each week. The season will get under way with a one-day opening (July 1), and will be closed July 2-3 before reopening on its regular weekly schedule Thursday, July 4.

Here are the numbers for the 2013 coastal salmon fishery as of July 4, 2013 updated.

ILWACO

June 22-23: 968 anglers caught 715 Chinook for 0.74 fish per rod, and 809 hatchery coho for 0.84 fish per rod and 1.57 total per rod average; and June 24-30: 2,364 anglers caught 683 Chinook (14.1 percent of Chinook quota of 9,900) for 0.29 fish per rod, and 2,607 hatchery coho (9.1 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 37,380) for 1.10 fish per rod and 1.39 total per rod average.

WESTPORT

June 23: 694 anglers caught 215 Chinook for 0.31 fish per rod, and 173 hatchery coho for 0.25 fish per rod and 0.56 total per rod average; and June 24-30: 899 anglers caught 274 Chinook (2.1 percent of Chinook quota of 23,500) for 0.30 fish per rod, and 202 hatchery coho (1.4 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 27,660) for 0.22 fish per rod and 0.53 total per rod average.

LA PUSH

June 29-30: 123 anglers caught 64 Chinook (3.9 percent of Chinook quota of 1,650) for 0.52 fish per rod, and 55 hatchery coho (2.9 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 1,890) for 0.45 fish per rod and 0.99 total per rod average.

NEAH BAY

June 29-30: 887 anglers caught 342 Chinook (7.0 percent of Chinook quota of 4,900) for 0.39 fish per rod, and 218 hatchery coho (2.8 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 7,780) for 0.25 fish per rod and 0.66 total per rod average.

COASTWIDE HATCHERY CHINOOK FISHERY

May 10-11: 629 anglers caught 72 hatchery chinook for 0.11 fish per rod average (0.9 percent of the total catch quota); May 17-18: 347 anglers caught 136 hatchery chinook for 0.18 fish per rod average (1.7 percent of the total catch quota); June 8-9: 762 anglers caught 208 chinook; June 10-16: 3,511 anglers caught 1,272 for 0.36 fish per rod average (20.2 percent of the total catch quota); June 17-23: 2,648 anglers caught 1,082 Chinook for 0.41 fish per rod average (33.7 percent of the total catch quota); June 24-28: 460 anglers caught 101 Chinook for 0.22 fish per rod average (35.0 percent of the total catch quota).

COASTWIDE ALL-SPECIES SALMON FISHERY

June 22-23: 1,662 anglers caught 929 Chinook (2.3 percent of Chinook quota of 40,000) for 0.56 fish per rod, and 982 hatchery coho (1.3 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 74,760) for 0.59 fish per rod and 1.15 total per rod average;

June 24-30: 4,273 anglers caught 1,363 Chinook (5.7 percent of Chinook quota of 40,000) for 0.32 fish per rod, and 3,082 hatchery coho (5.4 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 74,760) for 0.72 fish per rod and 1.05 total per rod average.