Daily limit of 4 chinook starting July 1 south of Ayock in Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal)

wdfg

June 14, 2017

Daily limit of 4 chinook starting July 1 south of Ayock in Marine Area 12

Action: Anglers can keep 4 chinook daily south of Ayock Point in Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal) beginning July 1.

Effective Date: July 1 through Sept. 30, 2017.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: South of Ayock Point within Marine Area 12.

Reason for action: State and tribal fishery managers agreed to a four-chinook limit for this area during the annual season-setting process this spring. This corrects the limit listed in the 2017/18 Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet.

Other information: Daily limit of 4 salmon, with a chinook minimum size limit of 20 inches. Release chum and wild chinook. Anglers may fish with two poles with a Two-Pole Endorsement. All waters within channels created by exposed tidelands are closed to salmon fishing at the Skokomish River mouth.

Other rules for waters south of Ayock Point remain unchanged, including Hoodsport Hatchery Zone. Check the sport fishing rules page for details on other fisheries: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/

Information contact: Mark Baltzell, (360) 902-2807, or Mark Downen, (360) 202-7005.

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Snoqualmie River fishing hours restricted starting 9/1/2015

Action: Closed to fishing daily from 2 p.m. until one hour before official sunrise, from the mouth to Snoqualmie Falls.

Effective dates: Sept. 1, 2015, until further notice.

Species affected: All species.

Location: The Snoqualmie River from the mouth to Snoqualmie Falls.

Rules:

Closed to fishing daily from 2 p.m. until one hour before official sunrise. Selective gear rules. Salmon: daily limit 3 plus 1 additional pink, release chinook and chum. Trout: daily limit, 2, minimum size 14 inches. Gamefish: statewide minimum size/daily limit. Closed waters within Puget Power tunnel at falls and within 50 feet of any point on Puget Power’s lower plant #2 building (north bank).
Reason for action: Excessively warm water temperatures and low flows raise concern about increased mortality for released fish. Limiting fishing to cooler morning temperatures reduces hooking mortality.

Additional Information: Temperatures and flow are being monitored and restrictions may lift as water temperatures decrease and flows increase.

Information contact: Jennifer Whitney, District 13 fish biologist, (425) 775-1311.

Wishkah River

wishkah river

Location:
Flows into the east end of Grays Harbor at Aberdeen.

Directions:
Take U.S.12 to Aberdeen and turn right on Wishkah Road which parallels the river.

Facilities:
Aberdeen has all you amenitites.

Contact:
Big Mouth John’s Tackle

Species:
Winter Steelhead, Coho and Chinook Salmon, Resident and Sea-Run Cutthroat Trout, and Seaperch

Fishing the Wishkah:
Though only one valley away from the Hoquiam, the Wishkah is a much better salmon and steelhead river, thanks to its better fish habitat and access to the water. Though your chances of hooking a keeper chinook aren’t all that great, work your way up Wishkah Road to the mouth of the West Fork Wishkah during October and November and you just might locate a Coho or two.
The winter steelheading is up and down from year to year, but some season the Wishkah will give up 150-200 fish. The best part of fishing the river is that the steelhead fishing remains pretty consistent from December until the end of the season in March.
Sea-Run Cutthroat is fair in the river in the month of October. Like the nearby Hoquiam, the regulations call for the release of all wild non-clipped Cutthroats.

Get ready Western Washington 800,000+ Chums are starting to show!

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chum

A return of 800,000-plus chum to Puget Sound and Hood Canal will let the good times roll for anglers well into the holiday months.

Chum, better known as dog salmon for their gnarly looking jawline at spawning time, are one of the hardest fighting fish and can feel like a king salmon when hooked on the end of a line.

Those targeting chums will be glad to know that some of the traditional hot spots are giving up some early chums, and it will only get better in the next few weeks as that is the peak time to be out there wetting aline for them in Hood Canal and for chum returning south of Kingston.

Some early chum have already shown up in catches around estuaries off Kennedy Creek in Totten Inlet, Johns Creek in Oakland Bay and the Hoodsport Hatchery in Hood Canal.

Here is a rundown from the creel checks that showed chum in catches:

  • Chico Creek estuary in Dyes Inlet — Oct. 14: Three anglers caught no fish; Oct. 15: Two caught no fish; Oct. 17: One caught no fish; Oct. 18: 20 caught two chum; Oct. 19: 18 caught one chum; Oct. 20: 10 caught four chum.
  • Curly Creek estuary near South-worth — Oct. 14: Six anglers caught two chum; Oct. 16: Two caught one chum; Oct. 20: Four caught one coho and two chum.
  • Hoodsport shoreline, Hood Canal — Oct. 18: Six anglers caught one chum; Oct. 19: 21 caught 12 chum; Oct. 20: 14 caught three chum.
  • Hartstene Island shoreline — Oct. 20: One angler caught three chum.
  • Johns Creek estuary in Oakland Bay —Oct. 18: 14 anglers caught one chum.
  • Tahuya ramp, Hood Canal — Oct. 17: One boats with three anglers caught 12 chum.
  • Kennedy Creek estuary in Totten Inlet — Oct. 18: Three anglers caught no fish; Oct. 19: 17 caught seven chum; Oct. 20: Four caught no fish.


  • Hoodsport fish check:

  • November 1 (26 anglers) (26 chum)
  • November 2 (57 anglers) (110 chum)
  • November 8 (29 anglers) (68 chum)
  • November 9 (87 anglers) (210 chum)

Other good places to try for chum are North Bay near Allyn, Perry Creek in Eld Inlet, Whatcom Creek in Bellingham, McLane Creek, Eagle Creek south of Potlatch State Park, and the public-access shores off Highway 101 from Eldon to Hoodsport.

Washington State Fish and Wildlife Salmon Checks July 8th -14th 2013

The Pinks are Coming!
“It is wall-to-wall pinks and lots of silvers up at Neah Bay, and it hard to get your line down to catch a chinook because you’ll end up nailing a pink or coho,”. “In no time the rest of the Strait will get inundated with pinks.”

Just east off Sekiu, the hatchery king fishing has been just fair at best, but there are increasing numbers of pinks and coho.

“Most of the boats at Sekiu are hanging in close to shore looking for kings, and the pinks are being caught further offshore,”. “I’m sure if they ventured father out they’d get into a lot of pinks. Some of the pinks I’ve seen at Port Angeles are decent size in the 5 pound range.” said Larry Bennett, the head state Fish and Wildlife fish checker in the Strait. “We had over 200 pinks checked at Port Angeles and they are catching them right along the shore.”

Don Armeni ramp, West Seattle — July 11: Nine boats with 19 anglers caught two chinook; July 12: 11 boats with 24 anglers caught 44 flounder; July 13: 21 boats with 42 anglers caught two chinook; July 14: 18 boats with 37 anglers caught three coho and one pink.

Eddie Vine ramp, Shilshole Bay — July 12: 11 boats with 19 anglers caught one coho and 15 flounder; July 13: 36 boats with 78 anglers caught 28 coho, one pink and 37 flounder; July 14: 39 boats with 85 anglers caught 12 coho and 37 flounder.

Mukilteo ramp — July 13: Four boats with seven anglers caught no fish.

Everett ramp — July 12: 12 boats with 26 anglers caught 13 flounder; July 13: 47 boats with 101 anglers caught two chinook, four coho and 52 flounder; July 14: 33 boats with 77 anglers caught two chinook.

Manchester ramp — July 8: Five boats with 10 anglers caught four flounder.

Port Orchard ramp — July 8: One boat with three anglers caught no fish; July 12: One boat with two anglers caught no fish.

Glenn Street ramp, Bellingham — July 8: Four boats with 12 anglers caught one chinook; July 12: Two boats with six anglers caught one chinook; July 13: 34 boats with 88 anglers caught 36 chinook and nine pinks; July 14: 26 boats with 79 anglers caught 45 chinook, one coho and one pink.

Cornet Bay ramp, North Whidbey Island — July 8: Seven boats with 15 anglers caught one chinook; July 12: 11 boats with 24 anglers caught nine chinook, seven coho and five pinks; July 13: 17 boats with 48 anglers caught 22 chinook, 32 coho and 30 pinks; July 14: 24 boats with 58 anglers caught 27 chinook, 31 coho and 43 pinks.

Washington Park ramp, Anacortes — July 8: 13 boats with 26 anglers caught four chinook; July 9: Five boats with 10 anglers caught four chinook; July 12: Eight boats with 17 anglers caught four chinook; July 13: 40 boats with 84 anglers caught 15 chinook, seven pinks and one sockeye; July 14: 28 boats with 61 anglers caught five chinook, four coho, 13 pinks and two sockeye.

Olson’s Resort, Sekiu — July 10: 61 boats with 155 anglers caught 66 chinook, 65 coho, 65 pinks and four rockfish; July 11: 57 boats with 127 anglers caught 45 chinook, 51 coho, 53 pinks and six rockfish; July 12: 68 boats with 170 anglers caught 54 chinook, 89 coho and 139 pinks; July 13: 160 boats with 426 anglers caught 132 chinook, 160 coho and 283 pinks; July 14: 69 boats with 190 anglers caught 57 chinook, 63 coho, 87 pinks, 24 rockfish, 16 kelp greenling and four lingcod.

Van Riper’s Resort, Sekiu — July 10: 43 boats with 98 anglers caught 54 chinook, 46 coho and 66 pinks; July 11: 53 boats with 136 anglers caught 85 chinook, 36 coho, 54 pinks, one rockfish and one flounder; July 12: 50 boats with 119 anglers caught 38 chinook, 35 coho, 78 pinks, three rockfish and five lingcod; July 14: 49 boats with 135 anglers caught 41 chinook, 41 coho, 40 pinks and nine rockfish.

Curley’s Straitside Resort, Sekiu — July 10: 16 boats with 37 anglers caught 15 chinook, nine coho and 23 coho; July 12: 16 boats with 43 anglers caught 12 chinook, 11 coho, 27 pinks and four rockfish.

Freshwater Bay ramp — July 13: 39 boats with 59 anglers caught 29 chinook, 29 coho and 16 pinks.

Ediz Hook ramp, Port Angeles — July 8: Six boats with 11 anglers caught one chinook, three coho and four pinks; July 9: Five boats with 12 anglers caught nine chinook and 12 pinks; July 10: Six boats with 14 anglers caught nine chinook and four pinks; July 11: 12 boats with 29 anglers caught 23 chinook, one coho and 14 pinks; July 12: 56 boats with 104 anglers caught 82 chinook, 11 coho and 117 pinks; July 13: 84 boats with 173 anglers caught 80 chinook, 18 coho and 258 pinks; July 14: 73 boats with 169 anglers caught 72 chinook, 12 coho and 138 pinks.

Port Angeles West ramp — July 9: Three boats with six anglers caught four chinook and three pinks; July 12: 19 boats with 40 anglers caught 14 chinook, five coho and 47 pinks; July 14: 33 boats with 75 anglers caught 23 chinook, two coho and 61 pinks.

John Wayne Marine, Sequim — July 12: Two boats with six anglers caught three chinook.

Port Townsend Boat Haven Marina — July 8: One boat with two anglers caught no fishl July 9: Two boats with six anglers caught no fish; July 13: Five boats with 10 anglers caught three kelp greenling; July 14: Four boats with nine anglers caught one chinook.

Hoodsport shoreline, Hood Canal — July 13: Two anglers caught one pink; July 14: 20 anglers caught four pinks.

Union ramp, Hood Canal — July 13: Two boats with four anglers caught no fish.

Twanoh State Park ramp, Hood Canal — July 12: One boat with two anglers caught no fish.

Skokomish ramp, Hood Canal — July 12: Two boats with three anglers caught no fish; July 13: Four boats with seven anglers caught no fish; July 14: Eight boats with 13 anglers caught one pink.

Redondo Beach ramp — July 10: Five boats with nine anglers caught no fish; July 14: 62 boats with 137 anglers caught three chinook, one coho and 20 flounder.

Narrows Marina and ramp — July 10: One boat with three anglers caught no fish; July 11: Three boats with four anglers caught no fish; July 12: 10 boats with 16 anglers caught one chinook.

Gig Harbor ramp — July 10: Seven boats with 15 anglers caught one chinook; July 11: Five boats with 10 anglers caught one chinook; July 13: 25 boats with 49 anglers caught five chinook and eight flounder.

Point Defiance Park ramp and Boathouse, Tacoma — July 8: 13 boats with 17 anglers caught one chinook; July 9: 10 boats with 17 anglers caught three chinook and 32 flounder; July 10: 18 boats with 30 anglers caught two chinook, one coho and 30 flounder; July 11: 69 boats with 104 anglers caught six chinook and 75 flounder; July 12: 35 boats with 64 anglers caught four chinook and 26 flounder; July 13: 111 boats with 236 anglers caught eight chinook and 165 flounder; July 14: 165 boats with 363 anglers caught 17 chinook, one coho and 95 flounder.

Solo Point ramp south of Tacoma — July 12: Eight boats with 14 anglers caught three flounder.

Luhr Beach ramp — July 12: Two boats with three anglers caught no fish; July 14: 11 boats with 22 anglers caught no fish.

Zittel’s Marina — July 8: Three boats with six anglers caught no fish; July 13: Nine boats with 18 anglers caught no fish; July 14: 13 boats with 24 anglers caught 43 flounder.

Brownsville ramp — July 12: Three boats with five anglers caught no fish.

Boston Harbor Marina — July 8: Five boats with 12 anglers caught no fish.

Olalla ramp — July 10: Two boats with three anglers caught no fish.

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Washington State Fish & Wildlife Salmon Checks July 1st – 7th 2013

Don Armeni ramp, West Seattle — July 5: 11 boats with 21 anglers caught no fish; July 6: 16 boats with 30 anglers caught one chinook and one coho; July 7: 12 boats with 18 anglers caught two coho.

Eddie Vine ramp, Shilshole Bay — July 5: Two boats with five anglers caught no fish; July 6: 14 boats with 29 anglers caught two coho and three flounder; July 7: Eight boats with 15 anglers caught four coho and six flounder.

Mukilteo ramp — July 6: 12 boats with 26 anglers caught 47 flounder; July 7: 10 boats with 31 anglers caught one coho and 124 flounder.

Everett ramp — July 2: Four boats with eight anglers caught one coho; July 6: 38 boats with 93 anglers caught five coho and 82 flounder; July 7: 28 boats with 52 anglers caught one chinook, one coho and 38 flounder.

Manchester ramp — July 2: Two boats with four anglers caught 73 flounder; July 7: Six boats with eight anglers caught one chinook, two flounder and 40 herring.

Edmonds Marina — July 6: Seven boats with 14 anglers caught no fish.

Port Orchard ramp — July 1: Seven boats with 13 anglers caught one chinook and 11 flounder; July 2: One boat with one angler caught no fish; July 6: Two boats with three anglers caught no fish; July 7: Nine boats with 16 anglers caught two chinook and five flounder.

Blaine ramp — July 1: Three boats with seven anglers caught one chinook; July 3: Two boats with two anglers caught one chinook; July 6: Five boats with 12 anglers caught no fish; July 7: Three boats with nine anglers caught two chinook.

Glenn Street ramp, Bellingham — July 1: 23 boats with 63 anglers caught 11 chinook; July 6: 28 boats with 74 anglers caught 23 chinook; July 7: 24 boats with 64 anglers caught 19 chinook and one pink..

Cornet Bay ramp, North Whidbey Island — July 1: Nine boats with 17 anglers caught five chinook and one pink; July 2: Nine boats with 18 anglers caught no fish; July 6: 23 boats with 61 anglers caught 27 chinook; July 7: 18 boats with 41 anglers caught 14 chinook.

Swinomish Channel ramp — July 1: Four boats with nine anglers caught no fish; July 6: Seven boats with 16 anglers caught four chinook.

Washington Park ramp, Anacortes — July 1: 52 boats with 123 anglers caught 42 chinook and one coho; July 6: 21 boats with 55 anglers caught seven chinook; July 7: 12 boats with 29 anglers caught eight chinook.

Olson’s Resort, Sekiu — July 1: 82 boats with 186 anglers caught 38 chinook, 28 coho and 17 rockfish; July 2: 94 boats with 230 anglers caught 42 chinook, 32 coho and three rockfish; July 5: 76 boats with 191 anglers caught 104 chinook, 36 coho, 28 pinks, 15 rockfish and one lingcod; July 6: 91 boats with 253 anglers caught 145 chinook, 78 coho, 63 pinks and one rockfish; July 7: 67 boats with 163 anglers caught 93 chinook, 59 coho, 25 pinks, five rockfish, one kelp greenling, two lingcod and one Pacific cod.

Van Riper’s Resort, Sekiu — July 2: 39 boats with 86 anglers caught 18 chinook, five coho and 18 rockfish; July 7: 36 boats with 95 anglers caught 49 chinoo, 32 coho, seven pinks and nine rockfish.

Curley’s Straitside Resort, Sekiu — July 5: 24 boats with 67 anglers caught 53 chinook and four coho; July 6: 25 boats with 59 anglers caught 19 chinook, 11 coho and one pink; July 7: 16 boats with 42 anglers caught 23 chinook, six coho, six pinks and seven rockfish.

Here are the results from the Olson’s Resort 80th Anniversary Salmon Fishing Derby held last Saturday, July 6, where more than 300 tickets were sold and anglers found good fishing.

The largest chinook was caught by Eldon Shofstal of Port Angeles and weighed 20.4 pounds and earned him $4,000. Second place was Eric Turnquist of Bremerton with a 20.2 pound king and he took home $1,300,and third was Rick Felkins of Port Angeles with a 20.1 pound king than paid off $500.

Corey Anson, caught the largest coho weighing 7.3 pounds and worth $2,000. The largest pink was caught by James Ryan of Shelton and weighed 5.4 pounds and earned him $1,100.

https://www.facebook.com/OlsonsResort

Sekui Salmon Derby Winner Eldon Shofstal

Freshwater Bay ramp — July 2: 13 boats with 22 anglers caught 15 chinook and one kelp greenling; July 5: 25 boats with 47 anglers caught 28 chinook, three coho, three pinks and two kelp greenling; July 7: 35 boats with 62 anglers caught 18 chinook, nine coho, six pinks and two kelp greenling.

Ediz Hook ramp, Port Angeles — July 1: 28 boats with 61 anglers caught 44 chinook and one coho; July 2: 17 boats with 34 anglers caught 28 chinook; July 3: 27 boats with 50 anglers caught 44 chinook, one coho and one pink; July 5: 59 boats with 116 anglers caught 65 chinook, five coho and 14 pinks; July 6: 88 boats with 194 anglers caught 71 chinook, 16 coho and 137 pinks; July 7: 65 boats with 146 anglers caught 28 chinook, eight coho and 151 pinks.

Port Angeles West ramp — July 1: 25 boats with 56 anglers caught 57 chinook and one coho; July 2: Five boats with 11 anglers caught five chinook and one flounder; July 6: 43 boats with 105 anglers caught 21 chinook, 12 coho and 101 pinks.

Skokomish ramp, Hood Canal — July 1: Four boats with five anglers caught no fish; July 6: Three boats with six anglers caught no fish; July 7: One boat with one angler caught no fish.

Redondo Beach ramp — July 1: 40 boats with 84 anglers caught 149 flounder; July 6: 36 boats with 80 anglers caught three chinook and 61 flounder.

Narrows Marina — July 6: One boat with three anglers caught no fish.

Gig Harbor ramp — July 6: 11 boats with 23 anglers caught two chinook.

Point Defiance Park ramp and Boathouse, Tacoma — July 1: 54 boats with 111 anglers caught five chinook, one coho, 103 flounder and one kelp greenling; July 2: Six boats with 13 anglers caught 26 flounder; July 5: 101 boats with 195 anglers caught 14 chinook and 188 flounder; July 6: 153 boats with 305 anglers caught 13 chinook, 168 flounder and 12 herring; July 7: 13 boats with 24 anglers caught five chinook and 60 flounder.

Luhr Beach ramp — July 1: 10 boats with 17 anglers caught no fish; July 3: Two boats with four anglers caught no fish; July 6: Five boats with nine anglers caught no fish.

Zittel’s Marina — July 2: Four boats with seven anglers caught no fish; July 7: Eight boats with 17 anglers caught no fish.

Fox Island ramp — July 6: Three boats with five anglers caught no fish.

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2013 South King County PSA Salmon Derby

salmon derby

For more information click on the link: http://pugetsoundanglers.net/

Snohomish River

Species:
Winter and Summer Run Steelhead, Chinook, Coho, Chum, and Pink Salmon, Sea Run Cutthroat, Dolly Varden, Sturgeon, Mountain Whitefish, and Rainbow Trout.

Location:
Enters the Puget Sound at the Port of Everett

Directions:
Take Interstate 405 to Highway 522 at Woodinville and turn east. Drive 12 miles to the bridge that crosses the Snohomish just before the confluence of the Snoqualmie and the Skykomish Rivers. Turn left (north) on Elliot Road and drive two miles to the first of several roads leading to the east (right) toward the river at various points. An alternative is to take Interstate 5 to Everett and drive east on U.S.2 to Snohomish, where two highway bridges cross the river and turn west (right) onto River Road to fish the south side of the river between Snohomish and Everett.

Facilities:
Boat ramps are located on the river in Everett, Snohomish, and off of 115th Avenue S.E., about midway between Snohomish and the Highway 522 bridge. Food, gas, lodging, and tackle are readily available in Everett and Snohomish. Try John’s Sporting Goods in Everett for some insider information with John Martinis.

Rules and Regulations:
See the WDFG rules and regulations pamphlet for further updated details.

Bio:
The Snohomish River is a river in the U.S. state of Washington, formed by the confluence of the Skykomish and Snoqualmie rivers near Monroe. It flows northwest entering Port Gardner Bay, part of Puget Sound, between Everett and Marysville. The Pilchuck River is its main tributary and joins the river at Snohomish. The river system drains the west side of the Cascade Mountains from Snoqualmie Pass to north of Stevens Pass.

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Fishing the Snohomish River:
This river system provides excellent angling opportunities for summer and winter steelhead, resident and sea-run cutthroat trout, resident rainbow trout, Dolly Varden and whitefish. Sturgeon are found in the lower reaches, and many salmon fishing opportunities. Two of Western Washington’s better steelhead and salmon rivers, the Skykomish and the Snoqualmie, join to form this big, slow moving river known as the Snohomish. Since all the sea-run fish bound for the Sky and the Snoqualmie have to pass through the Snohomish, it stands the reason that it can be a productive fishing spot.
The reason it isn’t an even better producer is that it’s so slow, and deep it’s difficult to read. There are not many distinguishable holding spots for salmon and steelhead, so many anglers come here, scratch their head and ask themselves “where do I start casting?”. The river’s size and the nature of the shoreline give boaters a better advantage in the lower portion of the river, and it’s those boater anglers who score the best catches from the Snohomish throughout the year.
The coho run is the backbone for the fall salmon fishery here, with the pinks in the odd years. October is the prime month to fish the river for action. Backtrolling various diving plugs or casting flashy spoons and spinners are the techniques that take them the best. Chartrues for the coho and pink for the pinks. Catchable number of coho’s continue to pass throughout the Snohomish in November, and some large chums are also available by then to add to the intrigue od the morning bite. The pink’s enter the river in September and are present in great numbers. September through to November can offer some great cutthroat and Dolly Varden fishing opportunities.
As for steelhead, the Snohomish shines brightest as a winter steelhead stream, often ranking among the state’s top 10 producing winter steelhead streams. Catches of 2,000 or more winter-runs per season are fairly common on the Snohomish River. December and January,, when large numbers of hatchery fish pass through on their way upstreamto the hatchery facilities at Tokul Creek and Reiter Ponds, are the top months to fish the Snohomish. Back trolling plugs or diver bait combinations account for a good number of winter steelhead, as does plunking with fresh roe clusters, various winged bobbers, or a combination of the two. Summer steelheading is also a good possibility here, but the numbers don’t compare to the winter steelhead catch. The best months being June and July.

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Monster Chum Salmon on the Snohomish River:

Monster Chum Salmon on the Snohomish River – Fishing – OSP from Oneshot Productions on Vimeo.