Yakima River (Lower)

yakima_columbia_river_mouth

Species:
Chinook and Coho Salmon, Large and Small Mouth Bass, Channel Catfish, Steelhead, Rainbow Trout, Carp, Mountain Whitefish
Location:
Flows into the Columbia River south of Richland.
Directions:
Drive east from Yakima to Granger on Interstate 82, paralleling the river most of the 24 miles. Take Granger Emerald Road east from Granger to parallel several miles of the river downstream of Granger. Continuing downstream, the stretch of river between Sunnyside and Prosser can be reached by driving south off Interstate 82 on Highway 241 about seven miles to the river or south from Grandview on Euclid Road. Interstate 82 parallels the river again along the 14 miles between Prosser and Benton City. Drive north from Benton city on Highway 225 for 10 miles to fish some of the lowest portions of the river before it joins the Columbia.
Facilities:
Several boat ramps are located along the lower Yakima, including those in Granger, the Sunnydale Wildlife Area, Horn Rapids, and the mouth of the river at Kennewick. Food, gas, tackle, and lodging are available in Yakima, Granger, Sunnyside, Grandview, Prosser, and the Tri Cities area.
Fishing the Lower Yakima River:
Chinook salmon on the Lower Yakima River is open for hatchery spring chinook from the I-182 Bridge in Richland to the Grant Avenue Bridge in Prosser. This section is expected to open sometime in May and to remain open through June 30.
Starting this sometime in May, the Upper Yakima River from the I-82 Bridge at Union Gap to the railroad bridge below Roza Dam will be open for hatchery spring chinook. This section is expected to stay open through July 31.
The Yakima is expecting a return of 5,000 hatchery chinook.
The daily limit is two adipose-fin-clipped hatchery chinook. All wild salmon and all steelhead must be released.
Anglers must have the Columbia River Salmon/Steelhead Endorsement, plus a fishing license. Anglers may also use two-poles by purchasing a “two-pole endorsement.” The fall chinook fishery starts in September and running into the month of October, with the coho fishery right behind it in the month of October.

The lower Yakima River from Granger downstream to the Columbia River is well known for robust populations of smallmouth bass and channel catfish during the spring and summer months. Though some shoreline areas are open to the public, most of the better fishing areas are only accessible by boat.
Unlike the “Blue Ribbon” trout waters upstream from Yakima, this lower stretch of the river meanders slowly through the flat river valley, warming fairly fast in the spring and summer and offering a haven for warm-water species. Clean rock and gravel comprise much of the river bottom throughout this stretch, providing perfect habitat for small-mouth bass, and they thrive in these waters. Although it doesn’t get much fishing pressure, those who do fish these waters of the Yakima tell lots of stories about the huge smallmouths that live here. The extreme lower end of the Yakima also has largemouths, but this river doesn’t offer a whole lot of prime cover for largemouth bass.
It does, however, suit channel catfish very well, and anglers have made some good catfish catches here over the years. Casting from the banks with chicken livers, night crawlers, and foul-smelling stink baits produce some channel catfish of 10 pounds or more, with the best fishing coming in the months of June and July.

yakima_river_map

Regulations:
There is no daily limit on bass in the Yakima River but no more than three over 15 inches can be retained. Channel catfish are present throughout the lower Yakima River but the best fishing is usually in the lower ten miles during late Spring and Summer. There is no current minimum size restriction and no daily limit on channel catfish in the Yakima River. A fall chinook and coho salmon season is scheduled for September 1 to October 22 from the mouth to Prosser Dam. The lower Yakima River is open to fishing from March 1 to October 22 below Prosser Dam and May 1 to October 31 above Prosser Dam to the Hwy 223 bridge at Granger. The lower Yakima River is closed to trout fishing (both resident trout and steelhead).

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