Sockeye fishing to close on upper Columbia River

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WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE   
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
600 Capitol Way North, Olympia, WA 98501-1091
http://wdfw.wa.gov

July 7, 2017

Sockeye fishing to close on upper Columbia River

Action: Close sockeye salmon fishing

Effective date: 12:01 a.m. on Saturday, July 8, 2017

Areas: 

  • Columbia River from the Washington/Oregon border upstream to Chief Joseph Dam
  • Wenatchee River
  • Similkameen River
  • Okanogan River
  • Chelan River

Reason for action: A revised sockeye salmon forecast of approximately 100,000 for the Columbia River is half of the pre-season forecast of 200,000 fish. After subtracting fish already harvested, those destined for Lake Wenatchee, and pre-spawn mortality, all remaining sockeye must be directed toward escapement and hatchery broodstock. 

Other angler information: Fishing for summer chinook salmon remains open as specified in the 2017-2018 sport fishing rules pamphlet.

Information contact: Chad Jackson, Region 2 Fish Program Manager, Ephrata, (509) 754-4624, Travis Maitland, District 7 Fish Biologist, Wenatchee, (509) 665-3337 or Ryan Fortier, District 6 Fish Biologist, Twisp, (509) 997-0316

Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW “Fishing in Washington” rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change (See: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/)  Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360) 796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431.

 

Recreational salmon fishery opens June 24 in the ocean

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WDFW NEWS RELEASE
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
600 Capitol Way North, Olympia, WA 98501-1091

http://wdfw.wa.gov/

June 22, 2017
Contact:
Wendy Beeghley, (360) 249-4628, ext. 215

Recreational salmon fishery opens June 24 in the ocean

OLYMPIA – Sport anglers will have the opportunity to reel in salmon off the Washington coast starting Saturday, June 24.

That’s when marine areas 1 (Ilwaco), 3 (La Push) and 4 (Neah Bay) open daily for salmon fishing. Marine Area 2 (Westport) will open a week later on July 1.

Fish managers expect slightly higher numbers of chinook and coho salmon will make their way through the ocean this year as compared to 2016, said Wendy Beeghley, an ocean salmon manager with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

Due to the improved forecasts, the recreational chinook catch quota this year is 45,000, up from 35,000 in 2016.This year’s coho quota of 42,000 fish is an increase of 23,100 coho from 2016, when anglers were allowed to keep coho only in Marine Area 1. Coho retention is allowed in all four marine areas this summer.

Anglers fishing in marine areas 1 and 2 will have a daily limit of two salmon, only one of which can be a chinook. In areas 3 and 4, anglers will have a two-salmon daily limit. In all areas, anglers must release wild coho.

All four marine areas are scheduled to close to salmon fishing at the end of the day Sept. 4 but could close earlier if the quota is met.

Throughout the summer, anglers can check WDFW’s webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/creel/ocean/ for updates.

More information about the fisheries can be found in the 2017-18 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, available at license vendors and sporting goods stores and online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/publications/01914/2017-18_marine.pdf

 

Daily limit of 4 chinook starting July 1 south of Ayock in Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal)

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June 14, 2017

Daily limit of 4 chinook starting July 1 south of Ayock in Marine Area 12

Action: Anglers can keep 4 chinook daily south of Ayock Point in Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal) beginning July 1.

Effective Date: July 1 through Sept. 30, 2017.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: South of Ayock Point within Marine Area 12.

Reason for action: State and tribal fishery managers agreed to a four-chinook limit for this area during the annual season-setting process this spring. This corrects the limit listed in the 2017/18 Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet.

Other information: Daily limit of 4 salmon, with a chinook minimum size limit of 20 inches. Release chum and wild chinook. Anglers may fish with two poles with a Two-Pole Endorsement. All waters within channels created by exposed tidelands are closed to salmon fishing at the Skokomish River mouth.

Other rules for waters south of Ayock Point remain unchanged, including Hoodsport Hatchery Zone. Check the sport fishing rules page for details on other fisheries: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/

Information contact: Mark Baltzell, (360) 902-2807, or Mark Downen, (360) 202-7005.

Recreational halibut fishing to open June 10 in Neah Bay, La Push and Puget Sound

June 6, 2017

Recreational halibut fishing to open June 10
in Neah Bay, La Push and Puget Sound

Action:  Open recreational halibut fishing Saturday, June 10, in Marine Areas 3 (La Push), 4 (Neah Bay), and 5-10 (Puget Sound).

Open halibut retention with bottomfish on board in the nearshore area in Marine Area 1 seven days per week effective Thursday, June 8, until further notice.

Effective date: Open recreational halibut in Marine Areas 3 through 10 effective Saturday, June 10, 2017.

Open the nearshore area in Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco) for halibut retention seven days per week in effective Thursday, June 8, 2017

Species affected: Pacific halibut

Location:  Marine Areas 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Reason for action:  Sufficient quota remains to open another fishing day in the north coast (Marine Areas 3 and 4) and Puget Sound (Marine Areas 5-10) on Saturday, June 10. Catch data will be evaluated following the opening on June 10 to determine if enough quota remains for additional fishing days in the north coast and Puget Sound.  If sufficient quota remains the next potential fishing day would be Saturday, June 17

There is sufficient remaining quota to allow halibut retention in the nearshore area of Marine Area 1 seven days per week. 

These rules conform to action taken by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) and the International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC). 

Information contact: Heather Reed, (360) 902-2487.

Hood Canal to reopen for one more Saturday of shrimp fishing

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE  
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
600 Capitol Way North, Olympia, WA 98501-1091
http://wdfw.wa.gov

May 23, 2017 

Hood Canal to reopen for one more Saturday of shrimp fishing        

Action: Recreational spot shrimp fishing will reopen for one day (Saturday, June 3) in Hood Canal (Marine Area 12).

Effective date:  9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, June 3, 2017.

Species affected:  All shrimp species including spot shrimp.

Location:  Hood Canal (Marine Area 12).

Reason for action:  Sufficient recreational spot shrimp quota remains for one more day of fishing. 

Other information: Several other marine areas will reopen for coonstripe and pink shrimp fishing only on June 1.

Contact:  Mark O’Toole, La Conner, (360) 466-4345 ext. 241, or Don Velasquez, Mill Creek, (425) 775-1311 ext. 112.

WDFW approves another day of halibut fishing in marine areas 3 and 4, portions of Puget Sound

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE  
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
600 Capitol Way North, Olympia, WA 98501-1091
http://wdfw.wa.gov

May 17, 2017

WDFW approves another day of halibut fishing
in marine areas 3 and 4, portions of Puget Sound

Action:  Recreational halibut fishing will open Thursday, May 25, in marine areas 3 (La Push), 4 (Neah Bay), and 5-10 (Puget Sound).

WDFW previously announced halibut fishing will be open May 21 in these same areas as well as Marine Area 2 (Westport).

Effective date: May 25, 2017.

Species affected: Pacific halibut.

Location:  Marine areas 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.

Reason for action:  After reviewing the most recent recreational Pacific halibut catch data, it is clear that sufficient quota remains to open another fishing day in the north coast (marine areas 3 and 4) and Puget Sound (marine areas 5-10) on Thursday, May 25. Catch data will be evaluated following the opening on May 25to determine if enough quota remains for additional fishing days in the north coast and Puget Sound. 

However, there will not be sufficient quota remaining in marine area 2 to open another all depth fishing day after Sunday, May 21. We will assess the Area 2 catch and, if there is sufficient quota to open a nearshore fishery, we will announce that the following week.  If not, then the nearshore fishery will remain closed. 

The recreational halibut fishery remains open in Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco) Thursdays through Sundays at all depths and Mondays through Wednesdays in the nearshore area.

These rules conform to action taken by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) and the International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC). 

Information contact: Heather Reed, (360) 902-2487.

Icicle River will not open for spring chinook fishing

Icicle River will not open for spring chinook fishing

Action: The Icicle River will not open for salmon fishing on May 15 as scheduled in the 2016-17 Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet. The river will remain closed to salmon fishing.

Effective date:  May 15, 2017.

Species affected: Hatchery spring chinook salmon.

Effective Locations: Icicle River (Chelan County)

(1)  From the closure signs located 800 feet upstream of the mouth to 500 feet downstream of the Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery Barrier Dam.

(2)  From the shoreline markers where Cyo Road intersects the Icicle River at the Sleeping Lady Resort to the Icicle Peshastin Irrigation Footbridge (approximately 750 feet upstream of the Snow Lakes trailhead parking area).

Reason for action:  Preseason forecasts and current in-season run analysis estimate the number of spring chinook salmon returning to the Icicle River may not be sufficient to meet broodstock collection goals (1,640 spawners) at the Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery.  To avoid a potential broodstock shortage, it is necessary to close the upcoming salmon season at this time. WDFW will continue to monitor spring chinook salmon returns to the Icicle River and could open the season if numbers improve.  

Information contact: Travis Maitland, District 7 Fish Biologist, (509) 665-3337, Jeff Korth, Region 2 Fish Program Manager, (509) 754-4624 ext. 224.

Razor clam digging closed for the season on 3 beaches; Dig at Mocrocks depends on toxin tests

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WDFW NEWS RELEASE
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
600 Capitol Way North, Olympia, WA 98501-1091

http://wdfw.wa.gov/

May 4, 2017
Contact
: Dan Ayres, (360) 249-4628

Razor clam digging closed for the season on 3 beaches;
Dig at Mocrocks depends on toxin tests

OLYMPIA – Three of Washington’s ocean beaches will remain closed to razor clam digging for the rest of the season while a potential dig at Mocrocks depends on additional toxin tests.

Test results on razor clams dug at both Long Beach and Twin Harbors beaches indicate levels of domoic acid exceed the threshold (20 parts per million) set by state public health officials, said Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 

“Based on the most recent toxin tests, razor clams will not be safe to eat for the remainder of the month at Long Beach or Twin Harbors,” Ayres said. 

Toxin levels at Copalis beach are below the health threshold. However, the beach will remain closed because diggers reached the number of harvestable razor clams for the season there, Ayres said.

State shellfish managers will consider scheduling an opening at Mocrocks later in May, depending on the results of two toxin tests, Ayres said. The first test results indicate levels at Mocrocks are just below the threshold. A second test is scheduled for next week.

“It’s possible toxin levels at Mocrocks will remain low enough to allow another dig there,” Ayres said. “But we need to see what the next results show before scheduling an opening.” 

The department likely will make an announcement next week on whether there will be another dig at Mocrocks this season.

WDFW routinely closes the razor clam fishery by the end of May when the clams begin to spawn. The next season will begin in fall, when the older clams have recovered from spawning and a new generation begins to grow beneath the sand.

Domoic acid, a natural toxin produced by certain types of marine algae, can be harmful or even fatal if consumed in sufficient quantities. The toxin has posed problems for razor clam and crab fisheries along Washington’s coast for the last two years.

More information about domoic acid, as well as current levels at all ocean beaches, can be found on WDFW’s webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/domoic_acid.html.